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Bringing Northern Styles South: A Brief History of the Lianguang Guoshu Institute
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    Transforming Southern Martial Culture   How did Taijiquan, now ubiquitous, establish itself in Southern China?  What about the other northern Shaolin systems? I would think that the lion’s share of the credit must go to the Jingwu Association… Continue Reading →

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: Dec 10, 2018: Young Masters, Colorful History, Chinese Swords
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  Introduction Its official, holiday madness is upon us. Still, I wanted to comment on some of the more interesting stories that have been floating around. For new readers, this is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media… Continue Reading →

Varieties of “Tradition”: Work, Play and Leisure in Martial Arts
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  A Different Kind of Race Horse races are strongholds of pageantry and tradition, but when it comes to medieval texture, few can compare with the Palio di Siena. Oddly, any footage of the event reminds me of a critical… Continue Reading →

Varieties of “Tradition”: Work, Play and Leisure in Martial Arts
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  A Different Kind of Race Horse races are strongholds of pageantry and tradition, but when it comes to medieval texture, few can compare with the Palio di Siena. Oddly, any footage of the event reminds me of a critical… Continue Reading →

Wabi-Sabi: Martial Arts in a Warming World
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    Martial Arts and Politics: The Big Picture   The latest (dire) global warming report produced by US government scientists is inspiring conversations everywhere. I overheard a particularly interesting discussion between two colleagues earlier this week which focused not… Continue Reading →

Wabi-Sabi: Martial Arts in a Warming World
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    Martial Arts and Politics: The Big Picture   The latest (dire) global warming report produced by US government scientists is inspiring conversations everywhere. I overheard a particularly interesting discussion between two colleagues earlier this week which focused not… Continue Reading →

STAFF VERSUS SPEAR
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– 棍進槍 STAFF VERSUS SPEAR 蘭晉如 by Lan Jinru [Chapters 7–10 of An Authentic Description of Shaolin Staff Methods, published Jan, 1930] [translation by Paul Brennan, Nov, 2018] – 第七章 棍進槍 CHAPTER SEVEN [CHAPTERS 7–10]: STAFF VERSUS SPEAR 開門式 第一動作 OPENING POSTURE … Continue reading

STAFF VERSUS SPEAR
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– 棍進槍 STAFF VERSUS SPEAR 蘭晉如 by Lan Jinru [Chapters 7–10 of An Authentic Description of Shaolin Staff Methods, published Jan, 1930] [translation by Paul Brennan, Nov, 2018] – 第七章 棍進槍 CHAPTER SEVEN [CHAPTERS 7–10]: STAFF VERSUS SPEAR 開門式 第一動作 OPENING POSTURE … Continue reading

2018 Christmas Shopping List: Martial Arts Equipment and Long Reads to Get You Through the Winter Months
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  I am not going to lie. The annual Christmas list is my favorite post of the year. So welcome to Kung Fu Tea’s seventh annual holiday shopping list!  Not only are we going to find some cool gift ideas, but hopefully… Continue Reading →

The Modern Roots of ‘Ancient’ Martial Arts
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I have just arrived back in Ithaca after spending Sunday driving rather than typing.  Still, I have two items that I want to share. The first is a short interview I did with the Rochester Review after The Creation of… Continue Reading →

Bruce Lee: Memory, Philosophy and the Tao of Gung Fu
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  ***I am off visiting family over the holiday weekend, so we are headed back to the archives. Since our (American) readers have just celebrated Thanksgiving, I though it would be appropriate to revisit an essay that asks what we… Continue Reading →

Bruce Lee: Memory, Philosophy and the Tao of Gung Fu
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  ***I am off visiting family over the holiday weekend, so we are headed back to the archives. Since our (American) readers have just celebrated Thanksgiving, I though it would be appropriate to revisit an essay that asks what we… Continue Reading →

Research Notes: Judo’s Triple Transformation in The China Press (1932)
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  Doing the Homework Students of Martial Arts Studies are the fortunate few.  As research areas go, ours is pretty interesting. Yet as I review the literature (even recent publications from big name academic presses), it is clear that many… Continue Reading →

Swords, Visuality and the Construction of China
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  Deciphering an Icon Recently I came across a few of Harrison Forman’s wartime photos, probably taken in the early 1930s, but circulated to newspapers and (re)published in 1938.  While his photos of militia groups following the 8th Route Army (discussed… Continue Reading →

The Last Shall be First: Finding Meaning in the Martial Arts
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    Barnum’s Daughter   I was recently watching the news when I saw a brief segment on “the last” Japanese swordsmith.  The whole things is a little overwrought as there are lots of individuals making swords in Japan today,… Continue Reading →

The Last Shall be First: Finding Meaning in the Martial Arts
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    Barnum’s Daughter   I was recently watching the news when I saw a brief segment on “the last” Japanese swordsmith.  The whole things is a little overwrought as there are lots of individuals making swords in Japan today,… Continue Reading →

Performance Ethnography and the Martial Arts Studies Reader
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  As the indomitable Professor Farnsworth would say, good news everyone! The long anticipated Martial Arts Studies Reader (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018) is now shipping.  Weighing in at 244 pages, and featuring articles by over a dozen of the most… Continue Reading →

Of Pens and Swords: Jin Yong’s Journey
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    The Loss of Heroes The Chinese martial arts community has lost two giants.  The death of Rey Chow (who was instrumental in jumpstarting Bruce Lee’s martial arts films) and Louis Cha (who wrote under the name Jin Yong)… Continue Reading →